Taking Care of Your Art

Published:    
August 7, 2017
Author:  
Trevor Abram
Category:  
Fine Art Services
As a Fine Art Services company, Martin&Martin's methodologies and practices come from the museum and conservation world. This created a know-how of what to do when it comes to caring for your precious items.

Learning Our Craft

How we handle, pack, crate, transport, store and install art, antiquities, and irreplaceable objects is a skill developed from past museum and conservation professionals. This skill has been handed down through years of working for museums, conservators, and our professional organization training conferences.  

For example, in the fine art services industry, if there is a material that is considered a good material to pack something in, then it will go to a conservator for approval and likely have an Oddy test conducted on the material. The Oddy test was created at the British Museum by their conservation scientist, William Andrew Oddy in 1973, to make sure the archival-ness of the material is truly what a manufacturer says it is. While materials may be approved for other industries, they may also have trace elements of acids, formaldehyde, or other fumes that can damage and even destroy delicate artifacts.

Packing and Handling

What is a packing material you first think of? Is it the very common Bubble wrap? We rarely use bubble wrap because bubble wrap can produce harmful (to art, not people) gasses causing the impression of the bubble to be permanently etched onto the surface materials. Next you might say tissue paper. We use tissue paper that is acid-free and safe. We have a rule of thumb at the office that if you can not see it, you can not possibly know how to safely handle it, and so we use it to cradle certain objects or as a barrier in-between flat objects. 

The materials that we use are archival and are not going to damage the object.

Why you should not wrap your art in just tape:

The tension of the tape stretching around the object to keep the tissue on is enough to cause the object to break.The more difficult it is to take the tape off, the more force it requires to get the tape off then to put it on again.

Next week, we'll discuss preparing your art for transit and our transportation division. Interested on how we can help with caring for your art this Summer? 
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